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About Corbetpark

About Corbett Park


Jim Corbett National Park lies in the Nainital, Pauri Garwhal and Bijnore Districts of Uttaranchal.
The present area of the Reserve is 1318.54 sq. km. including 520 sq. km. of core area and 797.72 sq. km. of buffer area. The core area forms the Jim Corbett National Park while the buffer contains reserve forests (496.54 sq.km.) as well as the Sonanadi Wildlife Sanctuary (301.18 sq.km.)The core is bounded to the North by the Kanda Ridge, with a height of 1043 m at its highest point.
The entire area of the reserve is mountainous and falls in the Shivalik and Outer Himalaya geological region. It forms the catchment area of the Ramganga, a tributary of the Ganga.
The Ramganga flows from East to West in the reserve through landscapes of incredible beauty. Dammed at Kalagarh at the south-western end of the reserve in 1974. The reservoir created, submerged 40-sq. km. of prime grassland. The area on the western side of the reservoir now constitutes the Sonanadi Wildlife Sanctuary.
After India attained independence in 1947 the park was renamed as Ramganga National Park. In 1956, it was renamed as Jim Corbett National Park, in memory of Jim Corbett. Project Tiger, India's ambitious conservation program to save the tiger and its habitat was launched from Corbett in 1973.

HISTORY

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Prior to the years 1815-20 of the British Rule, the forests of the Jim Corbett National Park were the private property of the local rulers. Though the ownership had passed into the British hands, the government paid little or no attention to the upkeep of the park. The sole aim was to exploit the natural resources and extract as much profit as possible from the jungle.
It was only in the year 1858 that Major Ramsay drew up the first comprehensive conservation plan to protect the forest. He ensured that his orders are followed strictly and, by 1896 the condition of the forest began to improve. Ramsays plan reflected the deep thought he had given to the science of forestry. In 1861-62 farming was banned in the lower Patlidun valley. Cattle sheds were pulled down, domestic
animals were driven from the forest and a regular cadre of workers was created to fight forest fire and secure the forest from illegal felling of trees. Licenses were issued for timber and count of trees was undertaken. In 1868, the Forest department assumed responsibility for the forests and in 1879 they were declared reserved forest under the forest Act. In a letter dated January 3,1907, Sir, Michael Keen for the first time referred to the possibility of turning these forests into a game sanctuary however the proposal was turned down. It was years later in 1934 the governor, Sir Malcolm Hailey, supported the proposal for the sanctuary and wanted the enactment of a law to give it protection. To overcome the delays that legislation would entail the area was made into a reserve forest by the Chief Conservator of forest.

Later in consultation with Major Jim Corbett, the boundaries of the park were demarcated and in 1936 The United Province national Park Act was enforced and this reserved forest became the first national Park of India. And it was aptly named Hailey National Park after its founder Sir, Malcolm Hailey.Initially the park measured merely 323.75 square kilometers, but to accommodate wild animals like Tigers and Elephants,
it was expanded to its present area of 520 square kilometers (core area) in 1966. The year 1973 was a landmark in the field of wildlife preservation. It was in this year that wildlife preservationist and naturalists from around the world launched PROJECT TIGER the most prestigious and biggest total environmental conservation project ever undertaken. The Jim Corbett National Park has the distinction of having been chosen the venue for the inauguration of this project.

Colonel Jim Corbett

Colonel Jim Corbett was born at Nainital in 1875, the eighth child of Christopher and Mary Jane Corbett. His father was the postmaster of Nainital. He did his matriculation at Nainital’s Philanders Smith College where he was admired by his masters for his modesty and retiring nature. He did not pursue his academics any further.

He spent his summers at Gurni House in Nainital while in winters he went down to Kaladhungi in the tarai jungles. It was here he was taught how to fire a gun by his eldest brother, to. Their bungalow in Kaladhungi was inside a dense forest in which a large variety of plants and animals found refuge. The abundance of wildlife in Nainital those days can be gauged from the fact that Jim spotted tigers and leopards within a six and a half-kilometer radius of the temple of the goddess Naini.
As a result of living in such exotic and beautiful surroundings he developed a spontaneous affinity with nature.At the tender age of ten he found himself addicted to hunting, he had shot his first leopard and would just pick up and train his gun on any wild animal he encountered in the Jungle. When he was eighteen he joined the railways at Mokama Ghat in Bihar working as fuel inspector and assistant station master. He then became a labour contarctor. When the World War I broke in 1914, he took a batch of five hundred Kumaon labourers to France. He was good at recruiting and organizing labour and was able to make them work for him willingly.
He also helped the British government by training allied soldiers in jungle warfare, he then hold the rank of lieutenant colonel. In 1920 after his health broke down he resigned from the job and returned to Nainital and for the next twenty-four years he served as an elected member of the Nainital municipal Board. While serving in the railways at Mokama Ghat, he would spend his holidays at Kaladhungi. Shikar of course would claim most of his time.
jimcorbett

He had bagged two man eaters, a feat which made his name a house hold name in the far flung areas and long before he was known as a skilled jungle man leading Shikar parties for the dignitaries.
It was during one such Shikar parties with three army officers the turning point came in the life of Jim – One a Shikar party somewhere in northern India they came upon a lake with thousands of water fowls. They were delighted to see the sight and shots rang echoing in the entire valley. In a matter of minutes their count stood at three hundred waterfowls. Jim could not stomach this sacrilege. From that day he developed an aversion to this type of Shikar.

And while his friends were overjoyed Jim vowed never to kill a beast without a reason. After he had killed a man-eater known as the Kuara of Pawalgadh in the mid thirties he gave up Shikar as a sport. There after he shot only those tigers which had turned man-eaters or cattle lifters.

Jim considered it his duty to kill such dangerous animals, a duty he carried out faithfully till his last days. E killed his last man-eater when he was well past sixty In those days the terror of Man-eaters loomed heavy on the regions of Kumaon and Garwhal and Jim was the only man who had the guts to take on and kill such bloodthirsty beasts, endowed as he was with his superlative skills required for the job he killed man-eaters in their den, in open grassland, in dense forest and on rocky slopes. Some of his most famous encounters are published in his six books of which the man-eaters of Kumaon and The Man Eating Leopard of Rudra Prayag are well renowned.

After World War II he settled in Kenya with his sister Maggie. It was there that at the ripe age of eighty he passed away leaving behind a legacy which still reverberate in the valleys of Kumaon and Garwhal.
In all his years serving the cause of wildlife preservation and later deliverer of peace and tranquility in the man eater infested regions of Kumaon and Garwhal Jim became inherent with the wildlife conservation and the Indian Government in 1956 renamed the park – Corbett National Park in honour of Jim Corbett the powerful missionary for wildlife preservation in India. A fitting tribute to the White Saint.
The finest h'abitats of the Indian Tigers. The area habitats of the Indian Tigers. The area boasts of a rich variety of wildlife - Leopards, Elephants, Wild Boars, Ghurals, Sambhars, Cheetals and many more. The forest even has more than 580 species of birds.

General Information

Temperatures

Tourism zones of the Corbett National Park (CNP) and the Sonanadi WLS are open to tourists from mid-November to mid-June. 
There is considerable variation in the climate during this period. The following table gives the statistics of the temperature and rainfall in the region during the year.

 

Month

Avg. Max. Temp. (C

Avg. Min. Temp. (C)

Avg. Rain (mm)

January

25 

60

February 

28 

4

 28

March 

34

 8 

30

April 

39 

12 

10

May 

43

 20 

25

June 

44

 23 

125

July 

38 

23 

450+

August 

35

 23 

450+

September 

34

 21 

243

October

 30 

16

 95

November 

29 

5

December

 28

 4 

14

 

 

What to carry

 

 

From Nov to March (Winter) : Heavy woolens, wind cheaters, comfortable walking   shoes, scarves, binoculars.
Summer : Summer clothes, comfortable walking shoes, hats , binoculars.

 

Do’s & don’ts

 

»
Deposit all litter at predetermined collection points.
»
Do not smoke in the forests.
»
Wear dull colored clothes when visiting the forest
»
Do not make noises/talk loudly inside a forest
»
Report your positive or negative observations to the authorities
»
Do not walk into the forest by yourself.
»
Respect local traditions, customs and religions
»
Do not encourage begging
»
Plant trees where possible
»
Do not collect plants or pluck flowers.
»
Reduce the use of paper
»
Do not touch anything in the forest if you can avoid it.
»
Use water sparingly
»
Do not dispose off garbage or pour detergent in the river.
»
Do seek permission when photographing local people in their homes
»
Do not use flash guns when photographing animals
»
Wear appropriate clothing. Keep body parts covered from dust, insects and strong sun
»
Do not use polythene bags.
»
Use toilets at authorised places only
»
Do not carry food with strong aroma into the forest.
»
Observe all the rules and regulations as laid down by the park authorities
»
Do not play radios inside the forest.
»
Employ authorised guides only
»
Do not carry fire arms into the forest.
»
Let Nature have the right of way every time
»
Do not make campfires.
   
»
Do not feed animals and birds in the forest

 

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